Posts Tagged ‘modernization’

Getting the Most Out of Your Investment: Three Steps to Revitalize Your Legacy System

Tuesday, October 4th, 2011

Companies don’t need to “rip and replace” large portions of their IT investments in order to gain the set of features they wantBy taking a multi-phased approach to incrementally roll in functionality, organizations can benefit from quicker ROI without the costs and risks associated with “big bang projects”. This multi-step approach is a win-win for business and IT; business can reap the benefits of go-to-market features sooner and IT will be able to adapt to changes more quickly.  Here is our recommended three step approach to revitalizing your IT architecture:

  1. Leverage What You Can: Revitalization efforts have to be carried out with a focus on leveraging your existing architecture. Wrapping your existing assets in web services keeps some of the older technologies in play.
  2. Implement As Needed: Keep it simple and only add functionality that’s really needed. By purchasing pre-built components that augment your existing systems, you can add the functionality you want with minimum configuration and customization.
  3. Rapidly Build New Functionality: Once you’ve decided on the new functionality that you would like to add to your system, we recommend that you rapidly develop these applications using software development automation frameworks such as FAST 8x. By rapidly building SOA-compliant components, you can leverage modern technologies and get the benefits of development efficiency.

Once you have implemented all three steps, you are on your way to fulfilling immediate business needs while achieving long term architectural goals for the future.

Darwinism of Innovation: The Evolution of Automation and the Software Development Industry

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

In 50 years, will we still have armies of programmers coding business systems for companies? Will it still be necessary?

In the history of industrial growth, the replacement of tedious production processes with automation is essential to the progression of invention and ingenuity. But we seem to have forgotten this key to innovation in software development. We are so caught up in creating new processes, new languages, new “big system” solutions to address the same old problems of tedious code-writing in traditional software development that we forget the true purpose of this industry in the first place – to replace tedium and inefficiencies of the paper-pushing era. We seem to have it stuck in our heads that software development is too complicated to automate.

The key to replacing expensive, labor-intensive and entrenched systems is not by engaging in expensive, labor-intensive big-bang projects, but in increasing productivity, flexibility, and function-leveraging. This is industrial Darwinism at its finest: instead of replacing one inefficient system with another, find a solution that eradicates the costliest, labor-intensive processes altogether. In short, creating dynamic software that will automate technical coding so that the user can focus on the functionality and conceptual use of the software is the true innovative key to the future of the software development industry.

Here at FAST, we have done just that. As a part of a four-person newly hired team of university graduates, we were assigned the daunting task of creating a fully functional application with FAST 8x in just four days, inclusive of training, configuration, building, and presentation. The exercise focused on showcasing how software development automation can achieve what normally would take a team of developers, analysts, and engineers months of code-writing to accomplish. None of us had any previous experience with software development; only one of us had any true technical knowledge of software design, and we were granted access to one engineer to assist us in the configuration process. By the end of the week, we had presented a production ready SOA based set of components that included 40+ database tables, 4 components, full user interface w/20+ business processes, 100+ web services, integration into other applications, 5,000+ test scripts (that are on a nightly regression cycle), technical documentation, and a how-to guide.

This proof-of-concept exercise is a reflection of what we’ve been doing for months on a larger scale with our life insurance client. In less than nine months, we were able to build an entire suite of legacy-replacing components which included 800 database tables, 35 components, full user interface w/25+ business processes, 700+ web services, integration into other applications, 13,000+ test scripts, technical documentation, and a how-to guide. This legacy system modernization process, which would have normally taken approximately three to five years to develop traditionally, is a remarkable step towards the breakthrough technology necessary to take software development to the next level.